Home » Films Directed by James Ivory (Film Guide): Howards End, the Remains of the Day, the Golden Bowl, a Room with a View, Le Divorce by Source Wikipedia
Films Directed James Ivory (Film Guide): Howards End, the Remains of the Day, the Golden Bowl, a Room with a View, Le Divorce by Source Wikipedia

Films Directed

James Ivory (Film Guide): Howards End, the Remains of the Day, the Golden Bowl, a Room with a View, Le Divorce by Source Wikipedia

Published September 5th 2011
ISBN : 9781155188423
Paperback
28 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Commentary (films not included). Pages: 26. Chapters: Howards End, The Remains of the Day, The Golden Bowl, A Room with aMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Commentary (films not included). Pages: 26. Chapters: Howards End, The Remains of the Day, The Golden Bowl, A Room with a View, Le Divorce, Jefferson in Paris, The White Countess, Slaves of New York, Maurice, The City of Your Final Destination, Mr. and Mrs. Bridge, The Householder, Heat and Dust, Surviving Picasso, The Bostonians, Roseland, Savages, The Europeans, Shakespeare Wallah, Quartet, The Wild Party, A Soldiers Daughter Never Cries, Jane Austen in Manhattan, Bombay Talkie, The Five Forty-Eight, The Guru, Hullabaloo Over Georgie and Bonnies Pictures, Autobiography of a Princess, Adventures of a Brown Man in Search of Civilization, The Delhi Way. Excerpt: The Remains of the Day is a 1993 Merchant Ivory film adapted by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala from the novel by Kazuo Ishiguro. It was directed by James Ivory and produced by Ismail Merchant, Mike Nichols and John Calley. It starred Anthony Hopkins as Stevens and Emma Thompson as Miss Kenton with James Fox, Christopher Reeve, Hugh Grant and Ben Chaplin. The film was nominated for eight Academy Awards. In 1950s England, Mr Stevens (Anthony Hopkins), the butler of Darlington Hall, receives a letter from Miss Kenton (Emma Thompson), who worked with him as housekeeper during the years prior to the Second World War. Twenty years later, Lord Darlington (James Fox) has died and his stately country manor has been sold to a retired American Congressman, Mr. Lewis (Christopher Reeve). Kenton reveals that her marriage has failed and that she is nostalgic for the days when she worked at the house. Stevens (now one of the few remaining servants from the Darlington era) goes to visit Miss Kenton, ostensibly to persuade her to return to service. The film flashes back to Kentons arrival as housekeeper. At the time, Darlington Hall was frequented by many politicians of the interwar period, men who deci...